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Both series were lower-paying editions of the concurrent syndicated series and were both produced by Ralph Edwards. Cassette Roulette—Eight oversized 8-track tapes were displayed, each containing a category. Name That Tune ran in prime time from 1953 to 1954 on NBC, with Red Benson hosting. After a guess was made, it was recorded and the contestant left the booth while Kennedy opened the smaller envelope and read the song's copyright information. As before, with one exception, the goal was to identify seven tunes in thirty seconds to win the grand prize. (Do you have sound? The highest-scorer won ten points. When Name That Tune returned to daytime in 1977, the Mystery Tune round was brought along with it. It was played for a grand prize, and each tune correctly guessed earned the champion a prize of some sort. If the contestant's guess matched it exactly, he/she won $10,000 a year for a decade (for a grand total of $100,000). On the 1970s series, all contestants kept the cash they earned, but only the winner of Melody Roulette got to keep the cash on the 1980s series. Contestants eliminated words so that only the words in the title remained. The day's winner picked a name out of a drum, then randomly selected one of the above prizes. It became popular and it was among the most watched TV series of Ho Chi Minh City Television. The faster the player named the tune, the more points they scored. The syndicated Kennedy run is intact. The show's bonus game was called the Golden Medley, with the object to identify seven tunes within the span of thirty seconds. Pick-a-Tune—Each tune would feature a list of words which included the words in the tune's title. For the first two weeks of the 1984 daily Name That Tune series, fourteen $100,000 winners from the previous series were brought back to compete for a second $100,000 in what was called the Super Champions tournament. Each of the first two games awarded 10 points to the winner and the winner of the third game scored 20 points. Pick-a-Prize—Another game played only on the 1977 daytime series, this one had the contestants shown an assortment of prizes, then alternating between listening to tunes and trying to name them for a prize of their choice each time. On the 1977 daytime version, each tune was worth $250, and all seven won a $2,500 prize package. Play continued until the champion correctly named all the tunes and won, until he/she ran out of time, or if a wrong guess was given at any point, which resulted in an automatic loss. This version allow contestants, usually one male and one female, who were selected from the studio audience, to score points as well as cash and prizes by winning music-related games. From 1977 to 80, it also featured a space offering a new car, but the car could be won only once per episode. The two players then played Tune Topics and Bid-a-Note for 10 points each and the Golden Medley Showdown for 20. Money Tree—Both contestants were given their own "tree" with 100 $1 bills on it. Jaka to melodia (What tune is that?) The Golden Medley round required five tunes to be named in 15 seconds, giving 3 choices per tune instead of 4, and using the fourth button to use as a pass. When the round began, security guard Jeff Addis opened the safe, and the player chose an envelope. The two winners came back on the third week, playing Melody Roulette, Sing a Tune, and Bid a Note for 10 points each, and Golden Medley Showdown for 30, to determine the $100,000 winner. On some occasions, the host of the show will sing. Bid-a-Note—The host read a clue to a song and the contestants alternated bidding as to how few notes (from a maximum of seven) they needed to identify the song. Each correct guess won $200, and $2,000 was awarded if the contestant guessed all six in 30 seconds. Seven tunes were played, and the contestant who correctly named the most tunes won the round and 10 points. In addition, the Name That Tune Orchestra was supplemented by The Sound System, a rock music ensemble led by Dan Sawyer with Steve March-Torme as its featured vocalist. Bidding ended when one contestant challenged the other to name the tune or a bid of one (or even zero) notes was given by a player. Like its syndicated predecessor, the 1984 series was known as The $100,000 Name That Tune and conducted a series of monthly tournaments to award the prize. airs 7 days a week on TVP1 and was first broadcast on September 4, 1997. The six winners returned for a three-week tournament, which was played like the 1977 tournament, except that only three players played Melody Roulette, and the first two players who correctly identified two tunes played the remaining two games for 10 points each. Every ninth episode would be a tournament final. Name that tune-Guess the song '(Name that tune - Guess the song) aired in September and October 2020 on TV8 always with Papi. A game based on the show was released for the short-lived CD-i home console. Played the same way as the syndicated round, a correct guess won the contestant a lump sum of $25,000. This game was seen only on the 1974 daytime series. This time, the two players had to correctly guess five tunes in 30 seconds, and if they did so they split $10,000 and returned the next week to try and do it again. The winner of that tournament was Elena Cervantes. Play continued until the champion correctly identified all seven tunes and won, until he/she ran out of time, or if a wrong guess was given at any point, which resulted in an automatic loss. Name That Video was a variation of the series that aired from 2001 to 02 on VH1. As on the show, one wrong guess ended the round immediately. [20] The game is often mentioned as a pioneer in the emerging wireless entertainment industry. In the 1978–79 season, two changes were made. Versions also aired in Australia, Armenia, Canada, France, Ukraine, Poland and Spain. From 1955 to 1959, only three tunes were played, worth $10, $20 and $30. Premiering in the United States on NBC Radio in 1952, the show was created and produced by Harry Salter and his wife Roberta. From 1976 onward, the syndicated show's title was changed to The $100,000 Name That Tune. This was played during the first few months of the 1970s syndicated version. The two winners came back on the third week, playing Melody Roulette, Sing a Tune, and Bid a Note for 10 points each, and Golden Medley Showdown for 30, to determine the $100,000 winner. The first ran from 29 July 1974, to 3 January 1975, with Dennis James hosting; while the second was broadcast from 3 January to 10 June 1977, and was hosted by Tom Kennedy. The winner at the end of the tournament won $10,000 in cash, plus $90,000 worth of prizes: a new automobile, an emerald and diamond necklace, a grand piano, a home entertainment center, a pair of watches, a spa, a vacation, and seven days per year in perpetuity at a timeshare resort in Palm Springs, California. Four of the cassettes also contained a bonus prize, which would be awarded to the contestant who correctly named the tune. In the 1950s version of Name That Tune, the contestants stood across the stage from two large ship's bells as the orchestra started playing tunes. Ring That Bell—As on the 1950s version, two bells were suspended from the ceiling, with each contestant about 20 feet away. The winning player had to correctly name six (later five) tunes. If the score was tied after three games, one sudden death tune was played to determine the winner; if both players were incorrect, the procedure was repeated. Once all seven tunes were played, the champion went back to play the passed tunes if there were any. Every ninth episode would be a tournament final, in which the winner won $10,000 per year for a decade (like in the Mystery Tune era), while the runner-up received a car as a consolation prize. The show was created and produced by orchestra conductor Harry Salter and his wife Roberta Semple Salter. In 1978, the show (which had switched to a disco set and theme) discarded the Mystery Tunes and the entire season was set up to have four nine-week $100,000 tournaments. An attempt to revive the show in 2007 with Donny Osmond as host went nowhere, but later, it was reported that MTV Networks had bought the rights to the series and planned to create concurrent versions of the show to air on MTV, VH1 and CMT. A clip from a James episode was used in a 1988 "Game Show Hosts Special" episode of FOX's The Late Show, and a full episode from 26 December was discovered in February 2010, and uploaded to YouTube by Dennis James' son Brad in October 2019. In the first two weeks, five or six players competed in an otherwise normal game, except that in Melody Roulette, only the first two players to answer two tunes continued, and the Golden Medley was turned into a competitive game called Golden Medley Showdown (the clock stopped when either player buzzed in or five seconds elapsed) worth 20 points, while Sing a Tune and Bid a Note each scored 10 points. From 1976-1978, Golden Medley winners were given a chance to win a major cash prize on the following episode by identifying one more song at the end of the show. Episodes from 1954, 1956, and 1957 are held by the Paley Center for Media.[8]. In 1978, the show (which had switched to a disco set and theme) discarded the Mystery Tunes and the entire season was set up to have four nine-week $100,000 tournaments. [5] George DeWitt took over in Fall 1955 until the end of its run in October 1959. Notable contestants during this period included the young singer Leslie Uggams and child actor Eddie Hodges who were followed by Betty Leary, a popular contestant whose 12 children filled the first row in the TV studio theater for seven consecutive shows. While playable, some gamers consider the machine's difficulty to be high due to the technical limits of the very basic synthesized music the machine was capable of. John Harlan was the show's announcer. The series finished at #30 in the Nielsen ratings for the 1956–57 season. When Name That Tune returned to daytime in 1977, the Mystery Tune was brought along with it. The show is currently placed on hiatus. The champion stopped the clock by hitting a buzzer, which was a cue for the band to stop playing, and could either give an answer or pass if he/she was not sure. The next day, the president of CBS, Frank Stanton, stated that all of its large-prize quiz shows were being cancelled because of the impossibility of guarding against dishonest practice.

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